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JESS New Issue Alert

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The table of contents for Volume 6 Number 3, September 2016 of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences is now available.

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In this issue:


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JESS Special Issue

Open Access to JESS Special Edition for March Issue

from JESS Editor-in-Chief Tony Rosenbaum:

The Journal of Environmental Studies (JESS) is pleased to announce that articles concerning the Food, Energy Water Nexus will be available online and accessible to all readers until April 23, 2016. This Special Issue features selected presentations from the 16th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment, sponsored by the National Center for Science and the Environment (NCSE) in January 2016, from related NSF workshops, and from other endeavors supported, among others, by NSF, USDA, NASA, the US Forest Service, NOAA, the US Geological Survey, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Papers are open access at the journal’s website. The conference, engaging approximately 1200 individuals from diverse disciplines and sectors, explored opportunities and challenges in applying science at the Food, Energy, Water Nexus. Papers in this issue assess the nature of human and scientific challenges raised by considering food, energy, and water systems together at scales from cities, to aquifers and river basins, to the entire globe. Many of the papers identify research agendas or address specific critical research challenges such as identifying appropriate questions, developing and using analytical tools, spatial computing, sensing and monitoring, and defining metrics at appropriate scales.

Additional papers address important environmental challenges at the nexus, such as resilience and human adaptations, engineering, infrastructure, sustainable ecosystems, nutrients, aquifer depletion, public values, mediating human conflicts, sustainable energy systems, engineering solutions, and integrative systems management. One paper argues persuasively for advancing a “Community of Practice” that develops the cross-cutting tools and skills for those working on the very diverse set of initiatives described in this issue. It is appropriate after reviewing so many challenges that the issue ends with a commentary providing “A Positive Vision of Sustainability.”

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JESS December Issue

The December 2015 issue of The Journal of Environmental Studies and Science includes the second Symposium on ‘Food System Resilience,’ a collection of fourteen articles which explore the national and global implications of food supply, scarcity, and strategies to create greater food security from a variety of different interdisciplinary environmental perspectives.

From the JESS Editorial staff:

  • A discussion by James Ward of the claim that urban agriculture (UA) reduces food costs and therefore has a role in improving household resilience during economic hardship. Using linear programming, he addresses the gap between claims and reality when it comes to UA actually reducing food costs and provides a case study as an example of how important factors such as crop yields, food prices and inputs (such as irrigation water) can be realistically quantified and an estimate of overall diet cost can be optimized. He concludes by proposing methods to meet regional food needs.
  • An exploration by Laura Lengnick of food system vulnerability resulting from exposure of the system to specific climate effects, the sensitivity of the system to those effects, and the capacity of the system adapt to those effects in order to maintain system integrity.  Based on a synthesis of recent literature conducted to explore the vulnerability of the US food system to climate change, the author suggests that the interaction between regional climate change effects and the geographic specialization and concentration of agricultural production in the USA increases the vulnerability of the US food system to climate change.
  • A description by Brett Tolley of the innovative Fish Locally Collaborative (FLC), an international decentralized network of fishermen and their allies which is promoting a paradigm shift in strategies to prevent chronic overfishing and recurring stock collapse of favored commercial fisheries. The FLC’s importance to small- and medium-scale fishing operations and its strategies to support coastal fishing communities are discussed at length, including attention to achievements, challenges, and case studies that promote more sustainable and resilient fish resources.

​We invite all members and non-members to submit articles for the Journal. Contributions are welcome from any discipline or combination of disciplines, any vocation or professional affiliation, any national, ethnic or cultural background. Articles may relate to any historical and global setting. See the website for more details.

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