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climate change

AESS Statement on IPCC Sixth Climate Change Report

Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences Statement on the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report 

March 10, 2022

According to the update of the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report on climate change released 28 February 2022, we may soon lose the ability to adapt to our changing climate if we do not curb emissions from fossil fuels. In addition, oil and gas exports fund Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Meanwhile, the U.S. Supreme Court is considering arguments in a case that will likely decide the ability of federal agencies to regulate carbon pollution from the power sector.

The Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences (AESS) stands firmly behind the consensus on climate science and the need to accelerate our efforts to study, mitigate, and adapt to the climate emergency. We support any and all efforts to conduct research, educate, and advocate for policies and equitable solutions to the climate crisis. We urge all affiliated institutions and cooperatives at AESS to work with us in supporting interdisciplinary and equitable approaches to tackling these intersectional challenges.

The following are ways you can take action:

The time is short, but change is still possible. We already have all the solutions we need to avert this crisis. We call upon all institutions and entities to act strongly and decisively in response to this collective challenge. To connect with us at our conference this June 20-22, visit https://aessconference.org/. For resources provided by AESS, visit AESSOnline.org.

See AESS’s other response to the IPCC report.

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AESS Statement on IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences Statement on the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report 

September 21, 2021

The verdict is clear. The IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) on climate change released on August 9 is nothing less than “a code red for humanity. The alarm bells are deafening, and the evidence is irrefutable.”

The IPCC scientists warn that unless rapid and deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions occur in the coming decades, global warming will exceed 2°C during the 21st century, with catastrophic consequences for ecosystems and societies, and achieving the goals of the 2015 Paris Agreement “will be beyond reach.” These consequences are already reality for vulnerable communities.

The Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences (AESS) stands firmly behind the consensus on climate science and the need to accelerate our efforts to study, mitigate, and adapt to the climate emergency. We support any and all efforts to conduct research, educate, and advocate for policies and equitable solutions to the climate crisis. We urge all affiliated institutions and cooperatives at AESS to work with us in supporting interdisciplinary and equitable approaches to tackling these intersectional challenges. 

Right now, we have a historic opportunity to act on climate. Democrats in the U.S. Congress are determining the provisions in the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package that would create investments in clean energy, put a price on carbon, and address environmental injustice. Only a few days or weeks remain before the package goes to a vote, which cannot be blocked by the filibuster. The following are ways you can take action: 

The time is short, but change is still possible. We already have all the solutions we need to avert this crisis. We call upon all institutions and entities to act strongly and decisively in response to this collective challenge. For resources provided by AESS, visit AESSOnline.org

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JESS ISSUE NOTIFICATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE MARCH 2021 ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES.

In this issue:

  1. Articles with Attitude
    The ambiguity of environmental disasters
    Peter R. Mulvihill
  2. Commentary and Opinion
    Commentary: integrating environmental DNA into applied ecological practice
    Jennifer Petruniak, Douglas Bradley… Robert H. Hanner
  3. Original Article
    Making the board: participatory game design for environmental action
    Katherine Ball, Kirk Jalbert, & Lisa Test
  4. Original Article
    Climate change perception, vulnerability, and readiness: inter-country variability and emerging patterns in Latin America
    Gabriela Azócar, Marco Billi … Anahí Urquiza
  5. Research Article
    Heterogeneity, trust and common-pool resource management
    Fijnanda van Klingeren & Nan Dirk de Graaf
  6. Original Article
    A gendered lens to self-evaluated and actual climate change knowledge
    Batanai Sammie, Elvis Mupfiga … Raymond Mugandani
  7. Articles with attitude
    Narrow pasts and futures: how frames of sustainability transformation limit societal change
    Janina Priebe, Erland Mårald, & Annika Nordin
  8. Original Article
    Community obstacles to large scale solar: NIMBY and renewables
    Sandra George O’Neil
  9. Original Article
    The Grand Concepts of Environmental Studies Boundary objects between disciplines and policymakers
    Jakob Lundgren
  10. Original Article
    Sustaining future environmental educators: building critical interdisciplinary teaching capacity among graduate students
    Diana Denham, Mary Ann Rozance … Erin Goodling
  11. Research Article
    A study of faculty perceptions and engagement with interdisciplinary research in university sustainability institutes
    Paul Bolger
  12. Original Article
    Narratives of place: critical reflections on place-making in the curriculum of environmental studies and sciences (ESS)
    Gabriel R. Valle
  13. Environmental Education
    Student representations and conceptions of ecological versus social sciences in a conservation course
    Amanda E. Sorensen, Jeffrey Brown … Jenny M. Dauer
  14. Correction
    Correction to: Student representations and conceptions of ecological versus socialsciences in a conservation course
    Amanda E. Sorensen, Jeffrey Brown … Jenny M. Dauer
  15. Book Review
    John Boehnert. Zoning the oceans: the next big step in coastal zone management
    Richard Smardon
  16. Book Review
    Karen D. Holl. Primer of Ecological Restoration
    Donald J. Leopold
  17. Book Review
    Ortwin Renn, Frank Ulmer, and Anna Deckert (eds.). The Role of Public Participation in Energy Transitions
    Richard C. Smardon
  18. Correction
    Correction to: A framework for teaching socio-environmental problem-solving
    Cynthia A. Wei, Michael L. Deaton … William R. Burnside

Note: AESS Members receive full access to JESS. If you would like to become a member to access JESS, join today!

To submit a piece for publication, review guidelines.

 

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Call for papers: environmental advocacy

The Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, produced quarterly by the international publisher Springer Nature, is looking to publish a collection of articles about current environmental advocacy.  We invite you to submit a manuscript for consideration among these selected articles.  We encourage manuscripts focused on the research, teaching, or application of advocacy concerning

  • climate change

  • biodiversity conservation

  • energy transition

  • environmental justice

  • environmental education 

  • toxics pollution

Articles may be original research, commentary, book reviews, and case studies. Contributions are welcome from scholars, educators, policy practitioners, policy advocates and students. 

Please include on the title page “For the Symposium on Environmental Advocacy.”

Manuscripts are due by October 31, 2020.

Please submit your manuscript at the journal website, http://www.springer.com/environment/journal/13412. Read the “Submission Guidelines” and follow the instructions provided for new authors. 

If you’d like to send an abstract before submitting a manuscript, editors would be happy to give you feedback. Please email at the addresses below.

Clara Fang
Symposium Editor
cfang@antioch.edu

Walter Rosenbaum
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences
tonyros@ufl.edu
  

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JESS Issue Alert

Table of Contents for the March 2018 issue of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences.

In this issue:

 

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AESS opposes US withdrawal from Paris Accord

AESS Statement on the US withdrawal from the Paris Accord

June 6, 2017

The Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences (AESS) stands with the majority of the world in opposition to the United States government’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement. Climate change is one of the most pressing socio-ecological challenges that humans must tackle to ensure an equitable, just, and sustainable future for our planet. Without action, a warming and unpredictably changing climate will at best lead to uncertainty and, at worst, will be devastating for human and nonhuman communities and the systems they depend on for survival. Ethics oblige us to oppose such short-sighted decisions, especially because many communities most at risk contributed least to the problem yet will bear the greatest burdens associated with resource decline, sea level rise, and exacerbated conditions of poverty and conflict.

The AESS community is comprised of interdisciplinary collaborators who focus largely on complex socio-ecological issues. We are solutions-oriented and our collective strength is the ability to mobilize behind appropriate science, policy, and action to mitigate issues like climate change. We are eager to share our research with the public and elected officials–all of whom have the ability to effectuate change–and engage with the broader community through direct action and education. Please contact our members or board if you are interested in collaborating.

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JESS Issue Release

Announcing the March 2017 issue of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences.

A sampling of the Table of Contents can be found below. View full list.

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Note: AESS Members receive full access to JESS. If you would like to become a member to access JESS, join today!

To submit a piece for publication, review guidelines.


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JESS Issue Release

Announcing the December 2016 issue of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences.

Below are a few of the articles you will find in this issue:

Goodsite, M. E., Bertelsen, R. G., Cassotta Pertoldi-Bianchi, S., Ren, J., van der Watt, L.-M., & Johannsson, H. (2016). The role of science diplomacy: a historical development and international legal framework of arctic research stations under conditions of climate change, post-cold war geopolitics and globalization/power transition. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 6(4), 645-661. doi:10.1007/s13412-015-0329-6 

The lead essay identifies and assesses the science diplomatic role of Arctic research stations. It explores three questions on the science diplomacy role and international legal framework of research stations in an Arctic characterized by transformation driven by climate change, post-Cold War geopolitics and globalization/ power transition. Arctic research stations play the role of diplomatic “intermediaries” bridging science, geopolitics and globalization. At least in the case of the USA, the primary motivation for establishing research stations in the Arctic has shifted from military security purposes (especially surveillance) to stations having broader mandates, related to environmental security, with climate change as a main driver. From an international law perspective, there is a need to have a stronger regulation on the interconnection between science and law clarifying the role of research stations to ensure that research stations are used effectively for peaceful purposes. The role of stations in the Arctic can become a constructive example to address issues of the nexus between climate change, science diplomacy, geopolitics, law and globalization that is shaping the future of the Arctic in the coming years. Stations have, in many cases, and will continue to reinforce international cooperation and collaboration through international research initiatives and programs. Results of the 2016 US election and the actual current geo-political environment underscore their relevance and the importance of continue to explore the three questions and other issues around the role of science diplomacy.

Bratman, E., Brunette, K., Shelly, D. C., & Nicholson, S. (2016). Justice is the goal: divestment as climate change resistance. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 6(4), 677-690. doi:10.1007/s13412-016-0377-6

This article explores campus fossil fuel divestment as a movement that politically engages resistance to the actions, forces, and structures that are producing climate change. Through re-politicizing sustainability, the divestment movement creates new challenges to traditional power structures and offers new modes and frameworks for environmental action. The case study in this paper explores the Fossil Free American University campaign and deploys an auto-ethnographic approach to understand specific elements including the place of climate justice, radical perspectives, and inside-outside strategies informed the campaign. We argue that the campus fossil fuel divestment movement holds potential to change the university’s expressed values from complicity with fossil fuel economies toward an emergent paradigm of climate justice. As a form of ecological resistance, the campus divestment movement approaches the political economy of fossil fuel exploitation as the foundation for shifting the paradigm of climate change discourse and action.

Linquiti, P., & Cogswell, N. (2016). The Carbon Ask: effects of climate policy on the value of fossil fuel resources and the implications for technological innovation. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 6(4), 662-676. doi:10.1007/s13412-016-0397-2 

Linquiti and Cogswell compute the Carbon Ask – the reduction in wealth that will be experienced by the global fossil fuel enterprise as the result of policies to limit global warming – at $185 trillion. The fossil fuel enterprise is not just big multinational oil and gas companies, but also includes the governments, investors, firms, and workers who explore for, produce, transport, distribute, and sell oil, natural gas, and coal. Common sense suggests that when the holders of $185 trillion in wealth are asked to surrender it for the greater good of the planet, they will have powerful incentives to resist a strong climate policy. To the extent they also hold political power, they may be able to impede progress. Accordingly, they speculate that if climate advocates continue to push tough carbon policies, then the political fights in America’s coal country are probably a harbinger of things to come in all fossil fuel industries. Transitional assistance to workers, communities, and possibly even firms, could not only improve the welfare of those entities on the receiving end of the Carbon Ask, it might also temper political opposition to climate policy.

PETER J. JACQUES, PH.D.
Professor of Political Science
University of Central Florida
MANAGING EXECUTIVE EDITOR,
JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES
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